The Wedding of David & Myriam (5)


The Wedding Ceremony.

As MB has already mentioned, the wedding ceremony of D&M took place in the Christian Maronite Church of St Jean Marc in Byblos, which is part of the modern day Lebanese town of Jbail. MB’s previous Lebanese wedding experience in December 2016 witnessed a Christian Orthodox ceremony in which the bride and groom do not utter a single word throughout. There was no “I do”. But, for the information of those who may not know, the Maronite Church is a branch of the Roman Catholic church, so the ceremony on Sunday last was similar in most respects to a Catholic Church wedding in Ireland – but no pictures of St Patrick were evident!

Anyway, the church interior and its floral decoration were stunning, as followers can see:

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The Wedding of David & Myriam (2)


The Guests Arrive (1 of 2).

MB lodged himself just inside the church entrance under some foliage to protect his follically-challenged head from the warm August rays. He had arrived at the church grounds some 30 minutes before the wedding ceremony was to take place to capture the location and the guests as they arrived. Despite wearing an open-neck shirt, minus any tie, it was still perspiration weather due to Jbail’s summer humidity, a consequence of its juxtaposition next to the adjacent sea.

And so the guests arrive:

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Transmogrify


Transmogrify.

“To change in appearance or form, especially strangely or grotesquely; transform.”

MB will not post anything strange or grotesque, but will instead focus on the ‘transform’ element of this weeks challenge.

Our local churches back home at Grange & Patrickswell are almost exclusively used for daytime and daylight activities throughout the year. Living in a very rural location there is no great, or hardly any, need for the opening of the churches after dark, save an occasional evening funeral service.

But at Christmas time each year the churches host Christmas carol services, or midnight masses which are actually on at approx 8pm (an Irish midnight!).

Anyway, it’s interesting to see them in their transformed Christmas state.

Grange Church

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Patrickswell Church

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Ireland Trip Photos


MB was back amongst his own two weeks back and was shooting anything that moved. He gives you some random shots from his HX locality:

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Happy Easter


A fresco at the Church of the Holy Saviour at Chora, Istanbul.

The Greek Orthodox church (& frescos) at Chora, in the Fathi district of the city, dates from approximately 1,300AD, but a number of churches have stood on the site since the 5th century. MB’s shot dates from a March 2015 visit to Istanbul.

Happy Easter to all.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Transition


Transition.

One day you’re single. Next day you’re not!

Friends of MB get married at ‘Our Lady of the Rosary’ Catholic Church in Doha, Qatar. June 2015.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Monochromatic


Monochromatic. Almost!

St John’s Church, Knockainey village.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Intricate


Intricate

Church of the Holy Saviour at Chora, Istanbul. Visitors view the famous intricate ceilings frescos.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Ephemeral


For MBs HX blog followers who are not native English speakers (& for a few who are) the word ‘Ephemeral’ means short-lived or temporary or brief. Capiche! Read More

Weekly Photo Challenge – Wall


The HX region has over 5,500 years of continuous human habitation dating to the neolithic period. On the road between HX crossroads and the nearby lake of Lough Gur lies the ruins of an old church called Teampall Nua (New Church – in English language), which dates from the 17th century.

From The Lough Gur website (loughgur.com):

New Church replaced an older chapel which was used by the Earls of Desmond. The present structure dates from 1679 – a simple rectangular building. It was endowed with a chalice and patten which bear the inscription: “The guift of the Right Honourable Rachel Countess Dowager of Bath to her chapel-of-ease Logh Guir, Ireland 1679” The famed poet harper Thomas O’Connellan who died in 1698 in Bourchiers Castle is buried here in an unmarked grave as is Owen Bresnan (1847-1912) local poet and historian who composed Teampall Nua and Sweet Lough Gur side.

A piece by Thomas O’Connellan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Blt9B16TIQ

Pics by MB!

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The Keeper Of The Secret


In a graveyard near MB’s HX homeland stands a headstone with the following inscription:

John Murphy died this

11th day of October 1784

aged 219 years

May the Lord have mercy on his soul

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Warmth


Warmth.

The entrance door to MB’s local Grange Church at last weekend’s Christmas Carol Service. The evening was a charity event in aid of St Vincent De Paul and other local charities. The money collector awaits inside (right of pic) with her large collection bucket. Well done to all who organised.

Great warm night. In many ways.

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Limerick – The Redemptorists


The Roman Catholic Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (known as the Redemptorists) has operated in Limerick since 1854 and their impressive Church was completed in 1862 at the cost of GBP 17,000. The church is built in the Gothic style and is known as Mount St Alphonsus Church. It was designed by an English Architect called Thomas Hardwick, who also designed the nearby St John’s Cathedral.  Read More

Istanbul – Christianity


Having spent the last two years in Saudi Arabia, it is interesting to see the symbols of Christian history (past & present) in Istanbul. No other religious practice or places of religious worship, other than those of the Islamic faith, are permitted in Saudi Arabia. Turkey has mosques and churches and synagogues for all to worship as they please.  Read More

Weekly Photo Challenge: Window


Bottom section of one of the stained glass windows at St John’s Church, Knockainey, South West Ireland. In honour of deceased wife, husband and son.

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