It’s The Weekend


The Pigeon House

Many people in the HX locality go for weekend walks around Lough Gur lake. And if one takes the walk from the car park to Ash Point on the Knockadoon Hill side of the lake, one will happen across the old stone remains of a Pigeon House on one’s left-hand side.

A Pigeon House was used in medieval times to house pigeons (really MB?!) which were a source of meat, eggs, and fertiliser. The one at Lough Gur is some 400 years old, maybe much older, and the specifications are included in the information plaque next to the structure.

Happy weekend!

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11 Comments on “It’s The Weekend

  1. You choosed Good and interesting topic Mr. MB. Actually it is important and interesting culture element in my country. In Anatolia, you can encounter numerous architectural examples at throughout the history of Anatolia. And it’s a very interesting subject. Actually I have a lot of photos on this subject, too. Photo of many pigeon house :)) I gladded to see different example in another corner from world. πŸ•ŠπŸ•ŠπŸ•Š

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  2. Fascinating! I had no idea pigeons were semi-domesticated in this way. Thank you for teaching me something new, MB β€” as you always do.

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    • Remember my dad telling me many years ago that people in Ireland shot pigeons and crows to put meat on the table during WW2, such was the scarcity of food at that time. Different days, thank God.

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      • Thank God indeed those days are behind us, MB. My father-in-law once shot a crow by mistake and decided to make the best of it and cook it β€” but he said it smelled so horrible as he was boiling it that he ended up burying both the bird and the pot in his back yard. No doubt an archaeologist will stumble upon the scene some 200 years hence and conclude that there was some sort of crow-worship being practiced.

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      • Thanks for that one H. It’s worth a post in its own right. The uncertainties of life. Mortality. The afterlife. Future perspectives. In that single incident there is so much material. Think about it!

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      • Mortality? The afterlife?! You certainly have the Irish gift for storytelling, MB. I just thought it was a warning about “aromatic” crows, haha.

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      • Have it on my bucketlist to read Ulysses. I believe one of the themes of the book is that the life experiences of one day actually include the life experiences on an entire life. If you write that crow post, I might be spared the task of reading Joyce πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Gosh. Well, MB … I’ll see what I can do. Anything to spare a mate having to read Ulysses!

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